Malaysian Public Policy Competition: Finals – Now open for public viewing

The Malaysia Public Policy Competition (MPPC) is an event that is jointly organized by UCSI University and the International Council of Malaysian Scholars and Associates (ICMS).

The MPPC is a case-based competition, set in the landscape of Malaysian public-policy making, aimed at giving local and overseas Malaysian students an opportunity to take on the role as a Malaysian public-policy maker. This competition is indeed a unique opportunity for participants to understand the importance of conception as well as implementation, and to tackle common policy dilemmas “in balancing “right” and “popular” policies.

It has been recently decided that the Finals of the Competition will now be opened to the public. That’s right – anyone and everyone interested in seeing who made it to the top, what they have to deliver and whether they are able to stand the heat of the judges are all welcome to this event!

The executive details of the Finals are as follows:-

Date:  4th September 2011

Time:  1.30 p.m. to 5.00 p.m.

Address:  UCSI University North Wing, Kuala Lumpur Campus

Jalan Choo Lip Kung,

Taman Taynton View,

56000 Cheras, Kuala Lumpur.

 

Interested parties are required to send their names and contact details to [email protected]. For more information, do visit www.malaysiapublicpolicycompetition.blogspot.com! Only 200 spots are available to hurry and sign up to avoid disappointment! See you there!

 


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2 Responses to Malaysian Public Policy Competition: Finals – Now open for public viewing

  1. Lets see the rubbish they discuss 1st . . . but the choices look hardly representative of all sectors’ opinions. All young students from Unis? What about aged civil servants? Middle aged blue and grey collar types? Idle rich and intelligensia without formal education? Just 1 mostly pro-government group from all countries. Does not represent the people at all?

    • Winson Lee

      Hi AgreeToDisagree,

      I understand where you are coming from in terms of the representation of the crowd. But, these guys are students and they are doing this for the very first time. Maybe they deserve a chance to prove themselves? After all, they did emphasize on talking less, and actually walking the talk.