A Year of The Jubilee

Passing the torch | Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/CrethiPlethi

Passing the torch | Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/CrethiPlethi

Though it pains me to read and see that people are killed and tortured by the authorities in the uprisings across the Arab world, this is a historic moment. A new world is beginning!

Honestly, I for one, never thought that this domino effect could take place there. It just goes to show that in a land of plenty, it isn’t the multitude that inherited the earth.

It was uplifting to see images of these people marching, smiling and chanting for change, especially when done in a peaceful manner. These are people called to a mission. They understand that such a mission will fully take possession of them. For it is a freeing mission. At long last, to be free; to be the people they should and can be. Gandhi would have been proud. Martin Luther King would not have felt alone.

The liberation of people throughout history always begins with a small act. It is always about the “little Davids” taking on the “Goliaths” of this world. It is the manifestation of one’s love over another. It is the rebellion of a conscience that has enough of archaic and draconian laws that mean to conquer and oppress. This is the 21st century; Genghis Khan would not fit in.

It is time to usher in the “Year of the Jubilee” where in ancient times, slaves were freed, mortgaged fields and houses would be returned to their owners without payment involved. It is time for the liberation of people from structures of oppression; to allow the awakening of each person regarding his own identity and self. It is time to promote human dignity; the restoration of the human person in all dimensions whether individual, family or social.

We should encourage the efforts of these youths, workers and all those who are clamouring for a more active participation in the building of their future. They should not have to be afraid of tyrannical leaders who instead of acting in solidarity with their people, act contrary to their interests. The land is theirs. They should not have to hunger and thirst, what’s more with oil money.

I didn’t know that while the doors of Louis Vuitton abroad were opened wide to these ruling elites, the majority at home hadn’t had enough to eat; they had no jobs. I always thought Arabians were filthy rich. How odd that the words rich and filthy go so well together.

Regimes across the world should take heed of what’s happening in the Arab League states. The people voted you into power. They rightfully own the land with you as their trusted guardian. So, don’t go squandering what belongs to the people. You have a responsibility towards your people. They will hold you responsible for your actions.

Throw out repressive laws. Even if they were creatures of their time, to continue using them is both oppressive and abusive. It will cost you to follow a path to liberation that is slow and opposed to human wisdom. Dismantle ancient structures in which injustice is embedded. It would do you wise to listen to the call for reforms before it’s too late.

Reconciliation is the way to go. It is never the case of fighting to the last man, unlike what an upstart would suggest.

May Chee Chook Ying resigned as a teacher some eleven years ago in an effort to be a better mother. Eleven years later, she’s still in the dark! Sometimes, because of what’s ingrained in her vocabulary, she makes remarks or typecast persons, which her 4 kids deem are racist. She’s trying hard to shake that off, very hard, but believes deep down inside, she’s not one. She feels blessed her kids can accuse both their parents of being racists! It is her kids who remind her, now and then, what it means to be Malaysian.

She believes a true Malaysia is possible. She has to because it’s possible she may have a grandchild whose name may be Travis Tuppani or Emma Abdullah. She’s going to love them all the same.


(Visited 145 times, 2 visits today)

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,


May resigned as a teacher some 12 years ago in an effort to be a better mother. Eleven years later, she’s still in the dark! Sometimes, because of what's ingrained in her vocabulary, she makes remarks or typecasts persons, which her 4 kids deem as racist. She’s trying hard to shake that off, very hard, but believes deep down inside, she is not one. She feels blessed her kids can accuse both their parents of being racists! It is her kids who remind her, now and then, what it means to be Malaysian. She believes a true Malaysia is possible. She has to because it’s possible she may have a grandchild whose name may be Travis Tuppani or Emma Abdullah. She’s going to love them all the same.

Posted on 9 March 2011. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0.

Read more articles posted by .

Read this first: LB Terms of Use